Local History and Genealogy

Tuesday, February 25, 2014


Orlenzo S. Light

The subject of this sketch was born in Allegany county, New York, April 9, 1842, and died at his home in Scott township, Steuben county, Indiana, Jan. 30, 1918, aged 75 years, 9 months, and 21 days.

When a small boy he came to Steuben county, where he grew to manhood, and in answer to his county's call, enlisted in the Union Army and was mustered into service on August 2, 1862, in the 74th Indiana Regiment, Co. H, and served until the close of the war, taking part in the battles at Chickamauga, The Wilderness, Missionary Ridge and in Sherman's march to the sea.

Mr Light was known by his comrades as a good soldier and won and held their respect to a large degree.  He was mustered out June, 9, 1865, he was joined in marriage with Selena Button, and to this union were born six children, three of whom had preceded their father in death.  Mr Light was always interested in the welfare of his fellowmen and ready to lend a helping hand where needed, and his honesty was never questioned by anyone.  Jovial in disposition, he was always looking on the bright side of life, and never complained.  He was a hard worker and an excellent provider for his family.

In the fall of 1916 he made the good confession and obeyed his Master in baptism, and later united with the North Scott Christian church and found great comfort in the promises of the Gospel.  

He leaves to mourn their loss his wife and three children, Mrs. Mary Myers and Mrs. Addie Sowles, of Scott township; and William Light, of Pike Lake, Mich., and many other relatives and friends.

Services were held on February 2, conducted by his pastor, Elder D. C. Ford.

Steuben Republican February 13, 1918

Mr. Light is buried at South Scott Cemetery per Steuben County Cemetery book.

Taken from the book "War Record of Steuben County, Indiana" by Jesse H. Carpenter
 Our company casualties were fortunately light. Robert Warren was wounded and once Orlenzo Light dropped as though killed, but on examination we found a bullet had passed through eight folds of his blanket and stopped at the ninth and last. It was a narrow escape with life, but many close chances occur in war."